Reach Out And Connect

 

The Rusty Anvil

The Berkshires of Massachusetts

 

Raei Bridges

Raei@the-rusty-anvil.land

(818) 741 6557

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© 2016 The Rusty Anvil

Nature Connection as Medicine

photo by Ru Wharton @ The School of Lost Borders

In 1982 Tomohide Akiyama coined the term “Shinrin-Yoku” which translates into English as “Forest Bathing”.  This practice involves engaging or "bathing" all of the senses in nature to experience regeneration and healing on a cellular level.

 

According to a study done by the Center for the Environment, Health, and Field Sciences in Chiba, Japan from 2005-2006, this practice is proven to provide a 12 percent decrease in cortisol levels, 7 percent decrease in sympathetic nervous system activity, 6 percent decrease in heart rate, and a 1.4 percent decrease in blood pressure*. It is proven to boost anti-cancer cell production (NK cells), improve mental restoration, creativity, and boost social connectivity. Time in nature is also able to help with behavior and impulse control, and high-order cognitive skills. These powerful boosts in health happen through the exchange of breathing in phytoncide from coniferous evergreen trees such as Hemlock, Pine, Spruce, Fir, and Cedar. Phytoncide are a compound released by these trees that helps boost their immunity. These phytoncide compounds have been found to have a beneficial effect on the immune system and regenerative capacity of human cells as well. When we practice mindfulness and slow ourselves down in nature we drop into our parasympathetic nervous system and allow cellular regeneration to occur. This exchange of healing, along with our current environmental standpoint, expresses the need for the human species to return to lifestyles intimately immersed in the natural world.

According to a recent study done in 2018 by the Environmental Protection Agency, the average adult spends 90% of their life indoors and 11 hours a day on a screen , and youth are not far behind at 7.5 hours per day** This industrial based lifestyle and perpetual disconnect from nature is at the core of the physical, mental, social, and emotional issues we are facing, and is a main cause of the perpetual destruction of the planet.

 

No longer do we trust our natural instincts, or live in sync with the cycles of  the planet. Instead we create clocks to track time and disconnect ourselves from the cycles of the sun and moon. We offer medicines that perpetuate our illness and create spaces to educate ourselves without first educating ourselves about the effects of those buildings and their materials on our health and our capacity to focus and retain information. Humans have created a new way of existing and we are seeing the consequences in our physical health, mental health, the health of the land, and the health of our animal kin.

The Rusty Anvil focuses on nature connection as a means of self-discovery, healing, and resistance to oppression. We focus on building an awareness of our reactions to the spaces we find ourselves in. We look at the ways oppressive forces seek to keep us indoors and away from natural lifestyles. Through my work in mindfulness based nature connection we hold spaces that encourage a transformation of the self, and of our relationship with nature. We focus on analyzing our place as humans and learning how we can become more aware of both the beings in the natural world around us, and the effects of our industrial lifestyles on our health. At The Rusty Anvil we work to encourage marginalized individuals to actively engage in environmental policy while collaboratively working towards healing ancestral-based trauma.

Join me for a day on the land to experience the healing our more-than-human siblings have to offer, and the ways we can become more reciprocal in our relationship with them. Together we will re-member our place and find ways to move forward in an environmentally concious community.

*https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2793346/

**https://www.epa.gov/report-environment/indoor-air-quality

**https://www.wespath.org/assets/1/7/5093.pdf